History Alive 2016

Children’s costume competition – History Alive 2016

The children’s competition returns to History Alive in 2016. It’s the perfect way to get children involved in history!

Dressing up is always heaps of fun, and memories are made from those moments.

You can make the kids excited about the whole process by involving them in the costume preparations! We recommend jumping on Google or heading to the library, and looking through historical websites or books to choose a time period or person from history. Because History Alive covers so many time periods, there are endless options for costumes! You’ll see everything from Roman, Viking, Medieval, High Medieval, Renaissance, Napoleonic, Colonial, Victorian, 20th Century (until the 1970s).

We know not everyone is great with a sewing machine or needle and thread, but that doesn’t mean you can’t create accessories and props to go with a purchased costume.

How to enter
Entry forms are located at the Information booth (near the entry gate). All children entering the competition must enter before 1pm each day.

Prizes
1st Prize: 2-day family pass for History Alive: A Journey Through Time 2017, family portrait and a surprise
2nd Prize: 2-day family pass for History Alive: A Journey Through Time 2017 and a surprise
3rd Prize: 2-day family pass for History Alive: A Journey Through Time 2017
Most historically accurate costume: 2-day family pass for History Alive: A Journey Through Time 2017 and a surprise

Here are the fine print details you need to know
For children of general public:

  • Costumes should be historical and based on historical periods represented during History Alive.
  • The competition will be judged on Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 of June in the Lytton Arena at xxx. These are two separate competitions, with entrants allowed to enter only once (unless your child wears a different costume each day).
  • Open to all children up to the age of 12. Children will be entered into one of two categories – 6 and under, and 7–12.
  • A top three from each gender will be chosen from each category.
  • There will be a special prize for ‘Most historically accurate’ costume for each day.
  • Entry Forms (including a photo release form) must be completed by a parent/guardian at the information booth
  • Prizes awarded are non-cash and not redeemable for cash.
  • All decisions made by the judges are final.

For children of re-enactors:

  • Costumes should be historical and based on historical periods represented during History Alive
  • Only one competition will be judged for re-enactors children, at 2PM on Sunday 12 June.
  • Open to all children up to the age of 12. Children will be entered into one of two categories – under 6 and 7-12.
  • Entry Forms must be completed by parent/guardian at the entry gate and will include a photo release form for use of images of the entrant by History Alive or its Agents.
  • Prizes awarded are non-cash and not redeemable for cash.
  • All decisions made by judges are final.

Oyez!

Town CrierThe peal of a bell is heard followed by the cry of “Oyez, oyez, oyez!” Everyone’s attention is captured by the man or woman about to speak. The Town Crier has something to announce.

Did you know? The word “oyez” is derived from Anglo-Norman French and means “hear ye” or “listen.”

From early times, Town Criers played a very important part in day-to-day life in towns and cities.

When people generally could not read or write, and especially before the invention and spread of the printing press, the Town Crier performed the vital task of communicating edicts from the monarch, local bylaws, market days, and trade advertisements.

Because Town Criers were sometimes the bearers of bad news (tax increases for example), they were protected by law. Anything done by the Town Crier was done in the name of the ruling monarch, and harming a Town Crier was considered treason. Whenever you use the expression “don’t shoot the messenger”, you’re invoking a time-honoured protection under law afforded to Town Criers.

Today, the practical need for the role has all but disappeared and the Town Crier has drifted into folklore, often represented as a plump man in a frock coat, three-point hat, with cherry cheeks, waving a bell.

However many cities around the world retain the role for ceremonial purposes and have maintained an unbroken line of Town Criers lasting centuries.

In Australia, the Ancient and Honourable Guild of Australian Town Criers is custodian of the tradition.

Strangely, Brisbane, Australia’s largest City Council, does not have an official Town Crier, and has at times called on the services of Town Criers from other cities for ceremonial duties, such as our very own Max Bissett from the Redland City Council, who has been at History Alive for the last three years. In fact, the Redland City Council is hosting the National Town Crier Championships in 2016 and has urged Brisbane City Council to officially appoint a Town Crier to represent Queensland’s capital.

A Town Crier will be doing their best to be heard over cannon and rifle fire, the clash of swords and the hum of historical life at History Alive 2016 at Fort Lytton National Park on 11 & 12 June, 2016.